POLICIES AND PROCEDURES: STUDENT SAFETY

Playground Safety

Games and Activities

Elementary students participate in recess before lunch so that children have increased appetites and ample time to eat. Active free-play and organized games are encouraged, however, contact sports such as Red-Rover, tackle-football and dodgeball are not permitted. 

Air Quality

Nahunta Hall follows the Utah Department of Health’s air quality guidelines to determine whether indoor recess needs to be substituted for outdoor recess on any given day. You can read more about the Utah Department of Health’s air quality guidelines at the Utah Department of Health website.

The school administration will monitor the temperature and air quality. A recess temperature of below 20 degrees Fahrenheit or unacceptable daily PM levels means that all students will participate in indoor recess. Students will be outdoors at all other times unless they have signed medical forms on file. Please make sure that your children are dressed properly for outdoor play during the winter season.

Notification to the Parent of an Injured or Sick Child

If a student becomes ill or suffers an injury during school hours and while on school grounds, at a school event, or on a school bus and a Nahunta Hall administrator reasonably determines that the illness or injury may require treatment at a hospital, doctor’s office, or other medical facility not located on the school premises, then Nahunta Hall shall:

  1. Notify the student’s custodial parent using any emergency contact information provided by the custodial parent to Nahunta Hall ; and
  2. If applicable and if requested in writing by a noncustodial parent, make reasonable efforts to notify the noncustodial parent using any emergency contact information provided by the non-custodial parent to Nahunta Hall. 

This policy does not apply to a noncustodial parent forbidden to have contact with the student under a court order or similar procedure. The custodial parent is responsible for providing the school a copy of the relevant court order or documentation associated with the similar procedure prior to the student’s attendance at school.

Management of Sports-Related Head Injury and Concussion

Nahunta Hall has established this head injury and concussion policy to provide education about concussion for coaches, school personnel, parents, and students. This policy outlines procedures for staff to follow in managing concussions, and outlines school policy as it pertains to return to play issues following a concussion.

Nahunta Hall seeks to provide a safe return to activity for all students following any injury, but particularly after a concussion. In order to effectively and consistently manage these injuries, procedures have been developed to aid in insuring that concussed students are identified, treated and referred appropriately, receive appropriate follow-up medical care during the school day and are fully recovered prior to returning to activity.

Administration, Physical Education specialists and Parent Committees shall review this protocol annually. Any changes or modifications will be reviewed and given to athletic department staff, including coaches and other appropriate school personnel in writing.

All appropriate staff shall attend a yearly in-service meeting in which procedures for managing sporting event-related concussions are discussed.

Recognition of Concussion

What is a concussion?  A concussion is type of traumatic brain injury that interferes with normal function of the brain. It occurs when the brain is rocked back and forth or twisted inside the skull as a result of a blow to the head or body. What may appear to be only a mild jolt or blow to the head or body can result in a concussion.  A concussion can occur even if a player or student in an activity is not knocked out or loses consciousness.  (NFHS “Suggested Guidelines for Management of Concussion in Sports.”)

Common signs and symptoms of sports-related concussion

Signs (observed by others):

  • Student appears dazed or stunned
  • Confusion
  • Forgets plays
  • Unsure about game, score, opponent
  • Moves clumsily (altered coordination)
  • Balance problems
  • Personality change
  • Responds slowly to questions
  • Forgets events prior to hit
  • Forgets events after the hit
  • Loss of consciousness (any duration)

Symptoms (reported by student):

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Double vision, blurry vision
  • Sensitive to light or noise
  • Feels sluggish
  • Feels “foggy”
  • Problems concentrating
  • Problems remembering

These signs and symptoms following a witnessed or suspected blow to the head or body are indicative of probable concussion. Any student who exhibits signs, symptoms, or behaviors consistent with a concussion (such as loss of consciousness, headache, dizziness, confusion, or balance problems) shall be immediately removed from the contest, game, or practice and shall not return to play until cleared by an appropriate health care professional.

Management and Referral Guidelines for All Staff

  1. The following situations indicate a medical emergency and require activation of the Emergency Medical System:
  • Any student with a witnessed loss of consciousness (LOC) of any duration should be spine boarded and transported immediately to nearest emergency department via emergency vehicle.
  • Any student who has symptoms of a concussion, and who is not stable (i.e., condition is worsening), is to be transported immediately to the nearest emergency department via emergency vehicle.
  • A student who exhibits any of the following symptoms should be transported immediately to the nearest emergency department, via emergency vehicle.
    • Deterioration of neurological function
    • Decreasing level of consciousness
    • Decrease or irregularity in respirations
    • Any signs or symptoms of associated injuries, spine or skull fracture, or bleeding
    • Mental status changes: lethargy, difficulty maintaining arousal, confusion or agitation
    • Seizure activity
  1. A student who is symptomatic but stable, may be transported by his or her parents. The parents should be advised to contact the student’s primary care provider, or seek care at the nearest emergency department, on the day of the injury.

Guidelines and Procedures for Coaches and Teachers Supervising Contests and Games:

RECOGNIZE ▪ REMOVE ▪ REFER

 Recognize concussion

  1. All educators and agents of the Nahunta Hall should become familiar with the signs and symptoms of concussion that are described above.
  2. Educators and agents of  Nahunta Hall shall have appropriate training about recognizing and responding to traumatic head injuries, consistent with the employees’ responsibilities for supervising students and athletes.

Remove from activity

Any student who exhibits signs, symptoms, or behaviors consistent with a concussion (such as loss of consciousness, headache, dizziness, confusion, or balance problems) shall be immediately removed from the sporting event and shall not return to play until cleared by an appropriate health care professional.

When in doubt, sit ‘em out

Refer the athlete/student for medical evaluation

  1. The agent of Nahunta Hall is responsible for notifying the student’s parent(s) of the injury.
    1. Contact the parent(s) to inform a parent of the injury. Depending on the injury, either an emergency vehicle will transport or parent(s) will pick the student up at the event for transport. (see Section II).
    2. A medical evaluation is required before returning to play.
  2. In the event that a student’s parent(s) cannot be reached, and the student is able to be sent home (rather than directly to MD):
  • The Nahunta Hall agent should insure that the student will be with a responsible individual, who is capable of monitoring the student and understanding the home care instructions, before allowing the student to go home.
  • The Nahunta Hall agent should continue efforts to reach a parent.
  • If there is any question about the status of the student, or if the student cannot be monitored appropriately, the student should be referred to an Emergency Department for evaluation. A Nahunta Hall agent should accompany the student and remain with the student until a parent arrives. 
  • The Nahunta Hall agent shall provide for supervision of other students for whom he or she is responsible when accompanying the injured student.

Students with suspected head injuries should not be permitted to drive home.

  1. Nahunta Hall agents should seek assistance from the host site certified athletic trainer (ATC) or team physician, if available, at an away contest if the injury occurs at a formal athletic contest.

Return to Play (RTP) Procedures After Concussion

  1. Return to activity and play is a medical decision. The student must meet all of the following criteria in order to progress to activity:
    1. Asymptomatic at rest and with exertion (including mental exertion in school) AND
    2. have written clearance from the student’s primary care provider or concussion specialist (student must be cleared for progression to activity by a physician other than an Emergency Room physician, if diagnosed with a concussion).
  2. Once the above criteria are met, the student will be progressed back to full activity following the step-wise process detailed below. (This progression must be closely supervised by an Nahunta Hall agent. If your school does not have an athletic trainer, then the coach must have a very specific plan to follow as directed by the athlete’s physician).
  3. Progression is individualized, and will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Factors that may affect the rate of progression include: previous history of concussion, duration and type of symptoms, age of the student, and sport/activity in which the student participates. An athlete/student with a prior history of concussion, one who has had an extended duration of symptoms, or one who is participating in a collision or contact sport may be progressed more slowly.
  4. Stepwise progression as described below:

Step 1. Complete cognitive rest. This may include staying home from school or limiting school hours (and studying) for several days. Activities requiring concentration and attention may worsen symptoms and delay recovery.

Step 2. Return to school full-time.

Step 3. Light exercise. This step cannot begin until the student is no longer having concussion symptoms and is cleared by a physician for further activity. At this point the athlete may begin walking or riding an exercise bike. No weight lifting.

Step 4. Running in the gym or on the field. No helmet or other equipment.

Step 5. Non-contact training drills in full equipment. Weight training can begin.

Step 6. Full contact practice or training.

Step 7. Play in game. Must be cleared by physician before returning to play.

  • The student should spend 1 to 2 days at each step before advancing to the next. If post concussion symptoms occur at any step, student must stop the activity and the treating physician must be contacted. Depending upon the specific type and severity of the symptoms, the student may be told to rest for 24 hours and then resume activity at a level one step below where he or she was at when the symptoms occurred. This resumption of activity could be considerably simplified for a student injured during recess compared to a student injured at a game or formal practice. 

Potential Problem Areas

While current Utah law designates that a student may be returned to play by “an appropriate health care provider”, Nahunta Hall may limit the credentials from which it will accept clearance in its sole discretion.  Generally, students will be required to provide a note from his/her health care provider before being allowed to return to play. This is a very important decision and will be made after careful consideration by the athletic coordinators, Director, Assistant Dean, teacher, and parent(s). The school’s liability carrier may also be consulted.  Nahunta Hall administration will not allow students clearly having concussion symptoms to return to play even if given clearance by a health care provider.

First Aid Training for School Employees

All full-time Nahunta Hall employees must hold a current First Aid and CPR/AED trained certification.

Medication Administration

Administration of Non-Prescription Medication

The administration of non-prescription medication is not a typical function of the school and it must be given whenever possible by parents at home. However, if a student must take medication during school hours in order to assume full participation in the school program, dispensing of non-prescription medication under some circumstances may be handled by a designated and trained school employee.

The question of dispensing non-prescription medication during school hours will be considered on an individual request basis made by the parent/guardian of the student needing the medication. No medication will be administered unless it is accompanied by a signed consent form. Once a consent form is on file, the parent/guardian may deliver medication to the school.

Consent to administer medication must be obtained EVERY time any non-prescription medication is administered. This consent may be obtained verbally, and will be recorded in the medication administration log.  Non-prescription medication will only be administered in the recommended dosage.  No non-prescription medication will be administered more than one time during the school day. If a student requires the administration of a non-prescription medication more than one time during the school day, that student should be considered too sick to stay at school.

All non-prescription medications MUST:

  • be brought to the school in the original packaging with the original label, and
  • be clearly labeled with the student’s full name.

The school does NOT administer ‘natural remedies’, herbs, vitamins, dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines, ‘enhancement’ pills, or medications from other countries.

Administration of Prescription Medication

It is the intent of Nahunta Hall to ensure that students with special medical needs are able to fully participate in all educational activities. If a student must take medication during school hours in order to assume full participation in the school program, dispensing of prescription medication under some circumstances may be handled by a designated school employee. The administration will identify individuals to be trained in the dispensing of prescription medications.

Nahunta Hall will work to establish and honor 504 plans for students with special medical needs. Nahunta Hall honors student 504 plans, and strongly recommends that students with special medical needs establish a 504 plan in a timely manner. The administration will work to accommodate the needs of students who have a doctor’s order for prescription medications that must be taken during school hours.

The question of dispensing prescription medication during school hours will be considered on an individual request basis made by the parent/guardian of the student needing the medication. No medication will be administered unless it is accompanied by a signed consent form. Once a consent form is on file, the parent/guardian may deliver medication to the school.

All prescription medications MUST:

  • be brought to the school in the original packaging with the original label, and
  • be clearly labeled with the student’s full name.

The school does NOT administer ‘natural remedies’, herbs, vitamins, dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines, ‘enhancement’ pills, or medications from other countries.

Medication Injections

It is the intent of Nahunta Hall to ensure that students with special medical needs are able to fully participate in all educational activities. Medical injections are best performed by those who have been properly trained in the procedure. The administration of medications via injection will not be performed by any untrained administrators, teachers or staff at Nahunta Hall. The administration will identify individuals to be trained in the administration of medical injections.

Nahunta Hall will work to establish and honor 504 plans for students with special medical needs. Nahunta Hall honors student 504 plans, and strongly recommends that students with special medical needs establish a 504 plan in a timely manner. The administration will work to accommodate the needs of students who have a doctor’s order for medical injections.

Prior to a student beginning the administration of his/her own injections, the parent/guardian must meet with a member of the Administration to conference regarding participation in this program. In addition, students/parents must fill out and return a doctor’s note stating that the student is able to administer his/her own medical injections. This process includes, but is not limited to, the ability to determine, calculate and administer correct dosages unassisted.

School staff will be on hand to ensure that syringes are properly disposed of, that the student has access to their medication in a timely manner, and that the student will have access to the faculty restroom, or another private location, to administer his/her medication. Syringes and sharps containers will be stored in an appropriate, accessible, locked location. Students will only carry syringes in accordance with an approved 504 plan in collaboration with the parent, administration, and a letter from a medical Doctor.

Parents are welcome to come to the school at any time during the school day to supervise  medication injections.

EPI-Pens and other emergency injections are an exception to the Medication Injection Policy.  EPI-Pens may be carried by the student after the Self-Administration of EPI-Pen Authorization Form has been filled out by a medical doctor and returned to the school. Faculty and staff of Nahunta Hall may administer EPI-Pen and other emergency injections in the event of an emergency.

Infectious Disease Control

Each student must have  current and complete health information on file. It is important that the school have accurate home and work phone numbers, as well as emergency contact information. Please notify the office immediately of any changes.  

If a student has a fever or displays symptoms of illness during school hours, a parent or guardian will be notified. A sick student must be picked up as soon as possible. Students with symptoms of an infectious disease will be isolated. If Nahunta Hall cannot reach a parent or guardian, the school will contact the individuals listed as emergency contacts. In the case of a medical emergency, Nahunta Hall staff will call 9-1-1. 

Symptoms which may indicate an infectious disease include:

  • a fever of 101 degrees or higher for infants younger than 4 months of age, or a fever of 102 or greater for children age 4 months and older
  • an unexplained rash
  • irritability
  • lethargy
  • a persistent cough
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • infected eyes with discharge

A child will be restricted from attendance at Nahunta Hall if one or more of the following conditions exists: 

  • The child has a fever defined by the child’s age as follows: 
    • Infants younger than 4 months of age: rectal temperature or temperature in the armpit equal to or greater than 101° F. 
    • Children 4-24 months: rectal or oral temperature equal to or greater than 102° F. 
    • Children older than 24 months: oral or rectal temperature equal to or greater than 102° F. 
  • Diarrhea, defined as an increased number of stools compared to the child’s normal pattern with increased stool water and/or decreased form. 
  • Vomiting illness with two or more episodes of vomiting in the previous 24 hours. 
  • Mouth sores associated with an inability of the child to control his/her saliva. 
  • Rash with fever or behavior change. 
  • Infected eyes with discharge, until 24 hours after treatment started by physician. 

Nahunta Hall must contact the Utah County Health Department in the event of a sudden or extraordinary occurrence of serious communicable disease. Such serious communicable diseases include: 

  1. Diphtheria 
  2. Food poisoning 
  3. Gastroenteritis (giardiasis, shigellosis, E. coli, Campylobacter, other) 
  4. Hepatitis A 
  5. Hepatitis B 
  6. Hepatitis C 
  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, AIDS) 
  8. Influenza 
  9. Measles (rubeola, red measles, hard measles) 
  10. Meningitis (Hib, other) 
  11. Mumps 
  12. Pertussis (whooping cough) 
  13. Poliomyelitis 
  14. Rubella (German measles) 
  15. Streptococcal infections (strep throat, scarlet fever, rheumatic fever) 
  16. Tuberculosis 
Chicken Pox

A child will be restricted from attendance until one week after the onset of rash and all lesions have dried and crusted.

Chickenpox cases will be reported to the local health department.

COVID-19

A child will be restricted from attendance as recommended by the Utah County Department of Health guidelines.

COVID-19 cases will be reported to the local health department.

Impetigo

A child will be restricted from attendance until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment has been started, until sores are dried, or until sores can be covered with a bandage.

Influenza

A child will be restricted if they have a fever or feel unwell. 

Diagnosed cases of influenza will be reported to the local health department.

Lice

A child will be restricted until after the first treatment with a medicated product.

Measles

A child will be restricted from attendance for at least four days after the rash appears. During an outbreak, susceptible persons (immunocompromised or not fully immunized) will be restricted from attendance until they are immunized or until two weeks after the rash onset of the last case of measles. 

Measles cases will be immediately reported to the local health department.

Meningitis

bacterial meningitis, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae

A child will be restricted from attendance until adequately treated. They may return to school when the child feels well enough and when a physician determines that the child is no longer infectious. 

Meningitis cases will be immediately reported to the local health department.

Mumps

A child will be restricted from attendance for at least 9 days after swelling first occurs or until swelling is gone.

Cases of mumps will be reported to the local health department.

Pink-eye

conjunctivitis

A child will be restricted from attendance until examined by a physician and approved for readmission. For bacterial infections, this is normally 24 hours after treatment is started by the physician. Conjunctivitis caused by viruses is not shortened by antibiotic treatment and may be contagious until the watery, white or yellow discharge has ceased. 

Pinworms

enterobiasis

A child will be restricted from attendance until after the first treatment.

Ringworm of the scalp, skin or feet

dermatophytosis, tinea, athlete’s foot

A child will be restricted from attendance until medical treatment begins. 

Roseola

A child will be restricted from attendance if they have a fever. A child with rash but no fever may return to school.

Rubella

German measles

A child will be restricted from attendance for 7 days after the onset of rash.

Infants born with congenital rubella syndrome must be evaluated before being admitted as they may shed virus over a prolonged period after birth. Patients with congenital rubella are considered contagious until they are at least one year old, unless nasopharyngeal and urine cultures are repeatedly negative for rubella virus.

Cases of rubella will be reported to the local health department.

Scabies

If a case has been confirmed, the child will be restricted from attendance until the day after treatment is started. 

A child with rash and fever or a behavior change, such as itching, must be restricted from attendance.

Shigellosis

bacillary dysentery

Shigellosis will be reported to the local health department.

Sore Throat or Tonsillitis

A child with a sore throat will be restricted if they have a fever or feel unwell.

Strep Throat and Scarlet Fever

A child with strep throat or scarlet fever will be restricted from attendance until 24 hours after antibiotic treatment is started.

Cases of scarlet fever will be reported to the local health department.

Viral Meningitis

aseptic meningitis

A child with fever who feels unwell will be restricted from attendance.  

Viral meningitis will be reported to the local health department.

Whooping Cough

pertussis

A child with whooping cough will be restricted from attendance until 5 days after start of antibiotic therapy or until symptoms are no longer present. Symptomatic children with a cough will be restricted until they are evaluated by a physician. Those diagnosed as having pertussis should not return to school until five days after starting antibiotics.

Whooping cough cases will be reported to the local health department. 

Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting by School Personnel

Any school employee who knows or reasonably believes that a child has been neglected, or physically or sexually abused, shall immediately notify the nearest peace officer, law enforcement agency, or office of the State Division of Child and Family Services (DCFS).

 It is not the responsibility of school employees to prove that the child has been abused or neglected, or determine whether the child is in need of protection. Investigations are the responsibility of the Division of Child and Family Services. Investigation by education personnel prior to submitting a report should not go beyond that necessary to support a reasonable belief that a reportable problem exists.

School officials shall cooperate with social service and law enforcement agency employees authorized to investigate charges of child abuse and neglect, assisting as asked as members of interdisciplinary child protection teams in providing protective, diagnostic, assessment, treatment, and coordination services.

Persons making reports or participating in an investigation of alleged child abuse or neglect in good faith are immune from any civil or criminal liability that otherwise might arise from those actions, as provided by law.

Nahunta Hall Administrators shall ensure that the anonymity of those reporting or investigating child abuse or neglect is preserved in according with State guidelines.

Reporting abuse or neglect to a school administrator, supervisor, school nurse or psychologist does not satisfy the employee’s personal duty to report to law enforcement or DCFS.